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Offline briguy

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2014, 07:29:00 am »
So all you have to do is take a picture? I would rather have to tell a person what name to use to look me up, or have them go through maybe a freinds list and contact me off of a friend. It is all "public information" it is on the internet and available to see, but at the same time what I put is my information, and I want to be able to have the option of giving that out or not.

It could also be used to check for sex offenders and criminal 'sorts'?  I agree that it is good to know for pedophiles and such, you want to keep your children away from threats.  But there are also registered sex offenders that shouldn't be.  If a person needs to go and takes a leak outside they have don'e nothing to deserve that list, or the teens that have consensual sex and have parents file charges.  I know that the list is there for a reason but at the same time it is used for people that should not be on it.

Offline ToneBender

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2014, 06:49:15 pm »
No. You don't have to take a picture - all you have to do is look at them with your google glass and it displays automatically.

Offline MustardHo!

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2014, 11:02:38 pm »
A sort of sub-issue of informed consent is these EULAs and privacy policies that are dozens of pages long and written in legalese - a positive development on that front is a push for shorter, simpler user agreements though I haven't actually seen one yet.

Wow yeah you're right, I remember when all I was seeing were articles and petitions for this kind of stuff, following a few examples the MSM picked up on where people got screwed in the fineprint. What the hell happened to the momentum? Or is change in the pipeline, but being held back by the usual financial "concerns"?

Shows how fickle the media is at least (and the general public I guess, me included, I'd completely forgotten about this debate :undecided:).

Americans: get chip technology - having to swipe my card down there was just embarrassing.

They don't have that in the US? Is credit card fraud a big thing over there then? It would seem really easy to scam somebody if all you had to do was swipe their card and forge a signature, if the cashier even bothered to ask you?

I agree with the general sentiments about consent as well - people are free to choose what they share and don't share online, so there does need to be some level of personal responsibility instead of wholly blaming the companies who exploit this.

However, the general level of internet education (amongst anybody but those who choose to take an interest in these things) is a huge problem, people just simply aren't aware of all the potential consequences of what they might put online. And (tinfoil hat time), big companies aren't exactly going to start educating people on this matter when it's so beneficial for them not to! When all people hear about is that not having control over your own data "improves integration", "helps connect with friends" etc., then they've got no reason to distrust it unless they choose to actively research further. But as ToneBender said, there's many real-world incidences - from jobhunting, medical/car insurance, interacting with your bank/university and the like - where a lack of control over your information online can (and does) come back to bite you in the ass.

Offline ToneBender

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2014, 07:27:02 am »
Speaking of...
This just in:

FACEBOOK seems to be experimenting on their livestock to among other things manipulate their emotions and learn new forms of control.

I don't think we have all of the details yet (nor that we ever will) but here is some new info on this widely reported scandal from a news organization (aggregator?) that I have never actually heard of before.

Source: http://scgnews.com/facebooks-psychological-experiments-connected-to-department-of-defense-research-on-civil-unrest

Facebook's Psychological Experiments Connected to Department of Defense Research on Civil Unrest

It turns out that one of the researchers who ran Facebook's recent psychological experiments received funding from the U.S. Department of Defense to study the contagion of ideas
 .


There has been quite a bit of chatter this past week after it was revealed that a recent Facebook outage was the result of a psychological experiment that the company conducted on a portion of its users without their permission. The experiment, which was described in a paper published by Facebook, and UCSF, tested the contagion of emotions on social media by manipulating the content of personal feeds and measuring how this impacted user behavior.



 

 
Over 600,000 users were used as guinea pigs without their consent, which raises a number of serious ethical and legal questions (particularly due to the fact that this study received federal funding), however there is an even more disturbing angle to this story. It turns out that this research was connected to a Department of Defense project called the Minerva Initiative, which funds universities to model the dynamics, risks and tipping points for large-scale civil unrest across the world.

In the official credits for the study conducted by Facebook you'll find Jeffrey T. Hancock from Cornell University. If you go to the Minerva initiative website you'll find that Jeffery Hancock received funding from the Department of Defense for a study called "Cornell: Modeling Discourse and Social Dynamics in Authoritarian Regimes". If you go to the project site for that study you'll find a visualization program that models the spread of beliefs and disease.

Cornell University is currently being funded for another DoD study right now called "Cornell: Tracking Critical-Mass Outbreaks in Social Contagions" (you'll find the description for this project on the Minerva Initiative's funding page).

The Department of Defense's investment in the mechanics of psychological contagion and Facebook's assistance, have some very serious implications, particularly when placed in context with other scandals which have broken in the past two years.

First of all we know that Facebook willingly participated (and presumably is still participating) in the NSA's PRISM program by giving the agency unfettered access to user communications. We also know that the U.S. government has invested heavily in technology used to track and model the spread of opinions on social media.

The U.S. government hasn't sought these capabilities for the sake of science. We know from the Cuban Twitter scandal, where the U.S. State Department where got caught red handed attempting to topple the Cuban government through social media, that these capabilities are already being used for offensive operations. Combine that with the fact that the U.S. Military got exposed in 2011 for developing 'sock puppet' software to create fake online identities and spread propaganda and an ominous picture snaps into focus.

The U.S. government is militarizing social media through a combination of technology and social sciences, and Facebook is helping them.

Moderator Comment  It is my personal view that some organizations are corrupt through to their cores. Organizations ultimately reflect the morality and values of their leadership and what continually comes from Facebook is disheartening to say the least. They seem to prefer the do whatever we want and beg forgiveness later approach and don't seem to realize that their product (facebook users) consists of actual human beings. Please be careful in all your dealings (if you must) with this company.

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2014, 09:56:55 am »
Please send me a message on the forum before contacting me over IM. For best results, also mention what you want to talk about, I am not much of a smalltalker.

Offline chrisw91

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2014, 03:16:17 pm »
relevant xkcd

 :345678


I personally think that the video game watchdogs is more accurate than most would think. The way things are going I wouldn't be surprised if we could find out everything about another person with a click of a button (or touchpad most likely)
I became aware of my destiny: to belong to the critical minority as opposed to the unquestioning majority.

Offline Gman707

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2014, 06:18:04 am »
Yeah. Souds a bit like being in an mmo. If this app is accessing Facebook and stuff then surely it can only show stuff you have made public anyway?
what's to say?

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2014, 10:42:12 am »
After having got burnt badly by posting on Usenet in my early 20's I am now extremely wary about what information I put on-line. Particularly because I have a unique name. Ironically this has led me to actually put more information on-line, but only innocuous bland information of no interest to anyone. The reason being that it then becomes a lot harder to sift through it all to find any information I don't want known that has been leaked on-line. Possibly information that I have no control over, for example if someone has a grudge against me and wants to slander me publicly. Something that my brother is in fear of at the moment with a bully at work who is stalking him on-line.

I don't even put a picture of my face on Facebook although I do have a professional website. Unfortunately in Germany it's very important to have some picture of yourself when applying for jobs so I keep a picture on my website.

If this facial recognition technology becomes common-place then I will take that picture down as well. Although I am a little suspicious. The language in the company's press release smacks of the usual bullshit vapour ware that I come across in R&D from companies trying to sell a prototype that doesn't work very well or which can't scale.

EJniceguy

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2014, 12:51:25 am »
I don't see how this can be considered legal, at least in my country. It's seriously freaky that with one app, a person could know everything about me that I've ever made public. It seems like something that could be so easy to hack and abuse as well.

Besides, it takes away the importance of getting to know people. I definitely wouldn't want a stranger to come up to me and already know what I like, my name, where I live, etc.

This whole thing is a violation of the basic Bill of Rights, more specifically the 4th amendment, the right to privacy. The American government, in my own humble opinion, is legally obligated to enforce the Constitution on this and stop this bulls**t now!

Now let it be said that I have no problem with people knowing things about me. I just want them to actually talk to me to learn about me.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 12:53:25 am by EJniceguy »

Offline Dan

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2014, 01:23:53 am »
Secret laws, secret tribunals, we define "search" as only the physical version...

They stopped giving a fuck about the constitution a long time ago.
"Politics is an ocean of toes" - Jacques Parizeau (1930-2015, RIP)

EJniceguy

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Re: Privacy in the Digital Age
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2014, 05:21:36 am »
@Dan Unfortunately, I feel like that's kinda true. It's going to have to be up to the people to fight to keep our rights, because its a slippery slope once the first one is taken away. It's the whole domino effect concept on a political and legal level.